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What is the aroma of coffee? Is aroma and flavour the same?

What is the aroma of coffee? Is aroma and flavour the same?

What is the aroma of coffee? Is aroma and flavour the same? Aroma is one of the primary coffee qualities denoting a coffee's flavour along with body, acidity, sweetness, bitterness, and aftertaste. A coffee's aroma is one of the main categories used by professional coffee tasters (cuppers) to judge the quality of a coffee.
How do you evaluate the flavours of a coffee?

How do you evaluate the flavours of a coffee?

So, how do you evaluate the flavours of a coffee? Tasting something and being able to describe it analytically is both difficult and requires specific experience; that’s why it tends to be a little bit scary for many at the beginning.
Everyone loves crema in a coffee. How does it form?

Everyone loves crema in a coffee. How does it form?

Everyone loves crema in a coffee. But how does it form? Beautiful crema. For a long, long time the appearance and quality of crema were the defining characteristics with which the quality of an espresso was judged. Traditionally, the perfect crema is a deep, reddish hazelnut colour that will hold a teaspoon of sugar for several seconds.
Coffee Strength and Coffee Body - What Does It Mean?

Coffee Strength and Coffee Body - What Does It Mean?

What does it mean that coffee has strength? Is it going to knock me out? Because there is no standard that provides coffee strength guidance, this term has been widely misunderstood, used in very different contexts and, as a result, it creates confusion amongst many.
Is acidity in coffee good or bad?

Is acidity in coffee good or bad?

So, is acidity in coffee good or bad? Well… it depends. There are good and bad acids where taste is concerned. Though there are many sources of acidity in coffee, it is only a mildly acidic beverage, with a pH of around 5, as compared to the pH of 2 in wine.
What is all the fuss about the water?

What is all the fuss about the water?

Water 💧 is the quiet and elusive partner of coffee. You need it to make coffee and it can change the flavour of it depending on the subtle differences in water composition. Recently, there has been a resurrection of research around the water composition and the quality of coffee. 👩🏽‍🔬 A key notion to take on board is that good tasting water does not necessarily mean good tasting coffee. For example, the bicarbonate content that makes a branded bottled water very smooth water to drink is basically responsible for removing acidity and sweetness in coffee.
Why is coffee extraction so important?

Why is coffee extraction so important?

The extraction of the coffee is at the core of any brewing or coffee-making process. When water passes through the coffee, it extracts some of the compounds and flavours and leaves some behind. It is the surprising complexity of this process that gives us so much of an intrigue as well as frustration when making coffee.
For The Coffee Savvy: What Is Coffee Cupping?

For The Coffee Savvy: What Is Coffee Cupping?

There are endless flavour notes to coffee. You can practice observing these through a coffee tasting technique called coffee cupping. In order to achieve the most consistent results, the “cupper” (which could be you) needs to follow very specific but simple procedures: 
What Is The Natural Coffee (Dry) Process?

What Is The Natural Coffee (Dry) Process?

After picking the ripe coffee cherries collected from the Coffea plant, the coffee beans are extracted by using a specific processing method. As already said in our last blog, there are 3 main processing methods: washed (or wet) process; dry (or natural) process and honey (or semi-dry) process. 
All about the "Washed (Wet) Coffee Process"

All about the "Washed (Wet) Coffee Process"

After picking the ripe coffee cherries collected from the Coffea plant, the coffee beans are extracted by using a specific processing method. There are 3 main processing methods: washed (or wet) process; dry (or natural) process and honey (or semi-dry) process. The washed process is the one that dominates the world of specialty coffee.